Goals

When I started setting my challenge list, I had put GOALS on Day 1 for obvious reasons. My original goal was to write every day, complete all the challenges. I started the list with booky things–I had based my challenge list off previous challenges I had done, although I tried my hardest not to use too many prompts from other people’s lists. But the longer I went along, the more I deviated from bookish themes, and started coming up with true writing prompts. I write about books all the time, but my mind is constantly getting pulled into other subjects that I want to write about. Let’s vary it up some. Of course, if you want to match books to the topics, feel free. I just want you to write something, anything, every day.

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Something else happened, too, after I set GOALS for Day 1.

I started taking a yoga class. And I completely fell in love with it. So, I have some new goals that surround the new lifestyle that I’m taking on. I have class 3 times a week–Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday. And even on the days that I am tired, and frustrated, and sore, I’m going. Every once in awhile, I may have a schedule conflict, and that’s ok. I couldn’t go Wednesday (ummm…Benedict Cumberbatch in Frankenstein on the big screen? Sorry yoga…priorities.), so I made sure to do stretches on Thursday. That’s the great thing about yoga–it’s so easy to do at home.

I don’t have any specific weight goals–in fact, I’m trying not to weigh myself. My instructors told me to take the focus off of that. The important thing is to focus on reducing my stress and maintaining my health, so that is what I’m working on now. My wellness is increasing, and I can feel it. I am already starting to notice a change in my body, it’s crazy!

Good things are going to happen in November. Who is ready?

 

Quote

If you wind up …

If you wind up boring yourself, you can pretty much bank on the fact that you’re going to bore your reader. I believe in keeping several plots going at once. The plot of a novel should be like walking down a busy city street: first there are all the other people around you, the dog walkers and the skateboarders, the couples fighting, the construction guys swearing and shouting, the pretty girl on teetering heels that causes those construction guys to turn around for a split second of silence. There are drivers hitting the brakes, diving birds slicing between buildings, and the sudden ominous clouds banking to the west. All manner of action and movement is rushing towards you and away. But that isn’t enough. You should also have the storefronts at street level, and the twenty stories of apartments full of people and their babies and their dreams. Below the street there should be infrastructure: water, sewer, electric. Maybe there’s a subway down there as well, and it’s full of people. For me, it took all of that to stay emotionally present for seven months of endless days. Many writers feel that plot is passé—they’re so over plot, who needs plot?—to which I say: Learn how to construct one first, and then feel free to reject it.

Ann Patchett, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage