Book to Movie And Back Again

For the longest time, I never let myself reread a book. Once I was done with it, I’d trade it in, move down the list, and never look back.

Why would I waste time reading something that I’ve already read? There are so many other books on my list, and that list is constantly growing.

But then…I started branching out from the Nora Roberts’ romance novel pattern, and read Jane Austen for the first time. I had read The Thorn Birds before, but I READ IT AGAIN. *gasp* I got my hands on a copy of The Secret Garden, which was my favorite book growing up. Other wonderful books started jumping out at me that I had to read more than once because once was just not enough.

Now, my shelves are full. I buy books because I want to keep them, not for trade in value. I am constantly staring at them, loving them, making lists of what I want to read next.


The Hubs got me The Hunger Games Trilogy for my birthday, and shortly after we saw the third movie in theaters. If you saw the movie, you know exactly why I was so anxious to reread the books. THAT MOVIE WAS…WHOA.

I just finished Mockingjay last night. And I know I was keeping R awake because I was breathing so hard. Even though I had seen the movies, there’s so much in the books that I didn’t remember reading. They were just so incredibly powerful.

And I find that happens often when I reread books, especially books that have been translated into screen. I always try to read the book first–because the books are so detailed, there are often pieces of the puzzle I’d miss if I didn’t read the book first. And then I watch the movie, and see the story put together in such a strong visual way. I get to see the characters cast (sometimes great, sometimes not, and sometimes…inconsistent…*cough Daario Naharis cough*), I get to see settings like the arenas from the Hunger Games and the Pit from Divergent.

And almost always, after watching the show or movie, I immediately want to reread the book it is based on. When I do, I find a million things I’ve missed or forgotten, or in the case of The Hunger Games, I start to wonder if I even read the books at all!

It’s what I’m wondering about The Divergent Trilogy now too. But I don’t think I’m alone there. These new Insurgent trailers are so weird. The end of the last movie had us all wondering where they were going with it, and obviously the new trailer is just so different from the book. I have no idea where they are going with this series but I’m going to have to reread the books soon, I think.

Where do you stand on rereading books? Any favorites?

WWW Wednesday 1/7/2015

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What are you currently reading?

The Iliad by Homer

The Same Sky by Amanda Eyre Ward

 

What did you just finish reading?

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Sins of the Father by Thelonious Legend (Book Tour Post will go live on January 14)

Travelling to Infinity:  My Life with Stephen by Jane Hawking

 

What do you think you’ll read next?

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

 

OK…Who made this book list anyway? Seriously, we need to liven things up a bit. Don’t be surprised if I do not follow this. YAWN!

Breeder

K.B. Hoyle will be releasing her new book tomorrow:  Breeder. I had a chance to read an advanced copy, and I’ve been dying to share this review with you for over a week now! It’s so hard not to post things right away!!

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Breeder is very similar to The Giver in many ways. You have a very structured, limited “utopian” society, rebuilt after several “Great Destructions.” In fact, the whole first part of the book, I kept thinking that I was essentially reading The Giver, from the birth mother’s perspective. It has that same, very eerie, “something is just not quite right” feel to the story.

Pria, or B-Seventeen, starts having those same feelings too, and then suddenly gets ripped from her very sheltered life. What she finds to be reality is terrifying, and the story shifts almost to a Mockingjay type of beginning.

Hoyle has a really good start to the series, and I’ll be really interested to see how far she takes it. While it is similar to many other utopian/dystopian series, there are some marked differences.

While there is some romantic interest building, it’s being done in a very slow, very interesting way. It’s not being thrust onto the reader, and it’s not the major focal point of the book, at least not yet.

Also, POC characters are the main focal point here. In fact, they are the majority. White people are considered genetically flawed, and recessive traits like freckles and blue eyes are being cauled out.

Hoyle did a great job with this, and I’ll be pulling for the second book in 2015. Definitely something to check out, guys!