Book to Movie And Back Again

For the longest time, I never let myself reread a book. Once I was done with it, I’d trade it in, move down the list, and never look back.

Why would I waste time reading something that I’ve already read? There are so many other books on my list, and that list is constantly growing.

But then…I started branching out from the Nora Roberts’ romance novel pattern, and read Jane Austen for the first time. I had read The Thorn Birds before, but I READ IT AGAIN. *gasp* I got my hands on a copy of The Secret Garden, which was my favorite book growing up. Other wonderful books started jumping out at me that I had to read more than once because once was just not enough.

Now, my shelves are full. I buy books because I want to keep them, not for trade in value. I am constantly staring at them, loving them, making lists of what I want to read next.


The Hubs got me The Hunger Games Trilogy for my birthday, and shortly after we saw the third movie in theaters. If you saw the movie, you know exactly why I was so anxious to reread the books. THAT MOVIE WAS…WHOA.

I just finished Mockingjay last night. And I know I was keeping R awake because I was breathing so hard. Even though I had seen the movies, there’s so much in the books that I didn’t remember reading. They were just so incredibly powerful.

And I find that happens often when I reread books, especially books that have been translated into screen. I always try to read the book first–because the books are so detailed, there are often pieces of the puzzle I’d miss if I didn’t read the book first. And then I watch the movie, and see the story put together in such a strong visual way. I get to see the characters cast (sometimes great, sometimes not, and sometimes…inconsistent…*cough Daario Naharis cough*), I get to see settings like the arenas from the Hunger Games and the Pit from Divergent.

And almost always, after watching the show or movie, I immediately want to reread the book it is based on. When I do, I find a million things I’ve missed or forgotten, or in the case of The Hunger Games, I start to wonder if I even read the books at all!

It’s what I’m wondering about The Divergent Trilogy now too. But I don’t think I’m alone there. These new Insurgent trailers are so weird. The end of the last movie had us all wondering where they were going with it, and obviously the new trailer is just so different from the book. I have no idea where they are going with this series but I’m going to have to reread the books soon, I think.

Where do you stand on rereading books? Any favorites?

WWW Wednesday 12/24/2014

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What are you currently reading?

The Iliad by Homer

Lock In by John Scalzi

 

What did you just finish reading?

Mission:  Impossible by Peter Borsocchini

Bel Canto by Ann Patchett

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

 

What do you think you’ll read next?

The Group by Mary McCarthy

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

Divergent

Divergent. I’m not even sure where to start with this review. I loved this series when I read it the first time. I blew through it as fast as my grubby little hands could get it from the library (and that, unfortunately, was not very fast…). It is the very epitome of tragic dystopian trilogy.

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And then, I watched the movie. And maaaaaaan how they butchered it, especially the ending. I mean what the HELL was Jeanine doing in that scene anyway?!

I was so confused by that scene that I was sure I had missed something. So when my book club chose Divergent, I decided to reread it from scratch to figure out what that was. Turns out, I was right. It was the movie that was wrong.

But, that’s not really much of a review, is it?

This is like Hunger Games without the venue. Typical love “triangle,” though Tris isn’t near as into one of the guys as he is her. There’s a whole lot of violence and drama, of course. Pretty much everything you expect from this genre.

The politics get a lot more alarming as you get into the second and third books. It’s always very freaky to think about what governmental crises could look like someday. Who knows what it will come to be? I am not a political person, but I think that is what draws me to this type of book. The curiosity of what may happen sooner or later.

The Scorch Trials

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!

Holy Freaking Cow, you guys.

I thought The Maze Runner was intense. Then I read the sequel. This series is CRAZY. Hunger Games meets Divergent crazy. It really makes you think about what could happen when our society goes bonkers. Kids killing kids, psychotic madness. Adults controlling things in ways that should never ever happen.

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Be ready for a heart attack. And make sure you have lots of water because this book will make you feel REALLY dehydrated. You won’t want to put it down.

I can’t wait to get my hands on the third book, so I’ll let you know how that one goes. I’m sure it’ll be just as intense!

The Maze Runner

In my last post, I talked about my recent love for fantasy. Another genre that I’ve picked up on is Dystopian Fiction. It’s interesting–when I was growing up, the future still looked bright. We had The Jetsons, we had Back to the Future. Even Jurassic Park had some cool technology…even if it was horrifying.

What does the future look like in today’s Young Adult fiction? Let’s see…we’ve got The Hunger Games and Divergent. The Giver is making a comeback. And now, The Maze Runner by James Dashner.

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Holy Cow is this book scary! Think Lord of the Flies, only where the boys have absolutely no memory of the life before they came to the Maze. The world they live in is not a friendly one, but the society they’ve built is day-to-day functional. They are basically hamsters in a box, and they know it. Enter Thomas, whose very existence seems to shake everything up, but no one has any idea why. The Ending is coming.

While HG and Divergent were mostly feminine based, this is YA written for a male audience. I think it’s very successfully done, and I’m interested to see what the target audience does with it. The movie is coming out soon–which I’ll be honest, is why I picked it up–so we’ll be hearing about this a lot very soon. It’s following on the shirttails of the Divergent release too, so there are going to be some big comparisons.

It’s worth the quick read, at the very least to stay culturally relevant. It’s an exciting book, and definitely not a boring read. I’ll read the next two in line once my turn is up on the library holds list, but I won’t rush out and buy them.

Thoughts?